Tag Results: Water Storage

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Potential mitigation of and adaptation to climate-driven changes in California’s highlands through increased beaver populations

Evaluating the potential for beaver to adapt to and to mitigate anticipated changes in California’s higher elevation land- and waterscapes.

Climate Change Adaptation Through Beaver Mimicry

Jeff Burrell with the Wildlife Conservation Society with demonstrates how installing inexpensive woody debris in streams to mimic beaver dams can encourage beaver damming to mitigate the negative effects of  less snow melt summer runoff due to climate change in Montana streams.

How beavers became North America’s best firefighter

A new study concludes that, by building dams, forming ponds, and digging canals, beavers irrigate vast stream corridors and create fireproof refuges in which plants and animals can shelter. In some cases, the rodents’ engineering can even stop fire in its tracks.

Livestock Grazing Limits Beaver Restoration in Northern New Mexico

The goal of this study was to evaluate factors such as cattle grazing that may limit the occurrence of dam-building beavers in northern New Mexico.

Identifying Where to Place Beavers and When to Use Beaver Mimicry for Low Tech Restoration in the Arid West

This second webinar in the ASWM-BLM Beaver Restoration Webinar Series focuses on making decisions about where beaver restoration and/or the use of beaver dam analogs (BDA) can have the greatest positive and least negative impacts. It includes a demonstration of Utah State University’s Beaver Restoration Assessment Tool (BRAT), a model that helps planners assess key parameters essential to beaver work.

Case Studies of Long-term Changes from Beaver Restoration Activities

This third webinar in the ASWM-BLM Beaver Restoration Webinar Series focused on the long-term changes in riverscapes that result from beaver restoration.  Where intense stream restoration is needed, people are identifying low-tech process-based methods that combine the management of grazing, beaver and other approaches that engage processes to create self-sustaining solutions.

Beaver Restoration for Climate Resiliency

The final webinar in the ASWM-BLM Beaver Restoration Webinar Series showcases research which indicates that beavers are able to create and maintain wetlands resistant to both seasonal and multiyear droughts and that this landscape wetting and drought buffering goes on to reduce or prevent burning in wildfire. Perhaps instead of relying solely on human engineering and management to create and maintain fire?resistant landscape patches, we could benefit from beaver’s ecosystem engineering to achieve the same goals at a lower cost.

Beaver Dam Analog (BDA) Webinar

This webinar by Dr. Nick Bouwes, Utah State University focuses on the use of Beaver Dam Analogs (BDA’s) to promote incised steam and beaver restoration. 2017

Virtual Field Trip:  Non-Lethal Beaver Conflict Resolution 

This webinar was presented by the Clark Fork Coalition in Montana with beaver experts Mike Callahan, Beaver Institute, Elissa Chott, Clark Fork Coalition in MT, and Torrey Ritter, MT DFW. Topics covered include beaver benefits, challenges and solutions. 2020

The Beaver Restoration Guidebook Version 1.0, 2015

A comprehensive compilation of information related to beavers and their management with an emphasis on stream restoration.

Using Beaver Dams to Restore Incised Stream Ecosystems

This study proposes that live vegetation and beaver dams or beaver dam analogues can substantially accelerate the recovery of incised streams and can help create and maintain complex fluvial ecosystems.

Working with Beaver to Restore Salmon Habitat in the Bridge Creek Intensively Monitored Watershed

Tested how assisting beaver to create stable colonies and aggrade incised reaches of Bridge Creek could create measurable improvements in riparian and stream habitat conditions and abundance of native steelhead.

Ecological engineering and aquatic connectivity: a new perspective from beaver-modified wetlands, 2014

This study demonstrated that beavers actively increase the volume-to-surface area ratio of wetlands by almost 50% and that their digging of foraging channels increases average wetland perimeters by over 575%. They concluded that exclusion or removal of beavers could limit ecosystem processes and resilience.

Human-made Beaver Dams Likely Save Natural Wetland from Extinction

The U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management blog reports that in arid, high country Oregon, a series of manmade beaver dams (Beaver Dam Analogs) have created a watery oasis.

Project: Hydrological Impact of Beaver Habitat Restoration in the Milwaukee River Watershed

A comprehensive study evaluating how restoring beaver dams could significantly protect the city of Milwaukee from future flood vents and the significant cost savings of this nature-based management approach versus traditional flood prevention engineering.

Interactions between climate change and beavers in coastal streams

This project investigated the effects of climate on multiple aspects of river hydrology, including the interaction with expanding beaver populations in the Northeast. Our findings suggest that beavers increase water retentions, and sometimes flooding, in rivers which increases nitrogen removal.

Could beaver compete with a declining snowpack?

To estimate the extent to which beaver dam building activity could provide transient water storage with a decreased snowpack.

Potential mitigation of and adaptation to climate-driven changes in California’s highlands through increased beaver populations

This study reviews three literatures in an effort to evaluate the potential for beaver to adapt to and to mitigate anticipated changes in California’s higher elevation land- and waterscapes.

Riparian Resilience in the Face of Interacting Disturbances

Impact of beavers regarding drought and wildfire in the Methow River Watershed