Tag Results: Drought

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Climate Change Adaptation Through Beaver Mimicry

Jeff Burrell with the Wildlife Conservation Society with demonstrates how installing inexpensive woody debris in streams to mimic beaver dams can encourage beaver damming to mitigate the negative effects of  less snow melt summer runoff due to climate change in Montana streams.

Farming and Climate Change: How Beavers Can Help

The Beaver Trust presents a webinar on Climate Change effects on farming in Europe and how beavers can help mitigate some of the resultant drought and flood damage. 2021.

Preston rancher restoring beaver to creek

Idaho rancher, Jay Wilde, and Joe Wheaton from Utah State University use BRAT, beaver restoration assessment tool, and identified good beaver habitat to help restore Birch Creek to year-round stream flow.

Beaver power provides year-long water to Idaho ranch

Idaho rancher, Jay Wilde, partnered with Anabranch Solutions to build BDAs, and the USFS and Idaho Fish & Game to relocate beavers into Birch Creek to help restore year-round stream flow.

Climate Change Be Dammed!

An Introduction to the Role of Beavers in a Warming World. Dr. Emily Fairfax’s ASWM presentation on the ability of beavers to combat climate change, such as reducing wildfire damage.

Beaver Restoration for Climate Resiliency

The final webinar in the ASWM-BLM Beaver Restoration Webinar Series showcases research which indicates that beavers are able to create and maintain wetlands resistant to both seasonal and multiyear droughts and that this landscape wetting and drought buffering goes on to reduce or prevent burning in wildfire. Perhaps instead of relying solely on human engineering and management to create and maintain fire?resistant landscape patches, we could benefit from beaver’s ecosystem engineering to achieve the same goals at a lower cost.

Working with Beaver to Restore Salmon Habitat in the Bridge Creek Intensively Monitored Watershed

Tested how assisting beaver to create stable colonies and aggrade incised reaches of Bridge Creek could create measurable improvements in riparian and stream habitat conditions and abundance of native steelhead.

Ecological engineering and aquatic connectivity: a new perspective from beaver-modified wetlands, 2014

This study demonstrated that beavers actively increase the volume-to-surface area ratio of wetlands by almost 50% and that their digging of foraging channels increases average wetland perimeters by over 575%. They concluded that exclusion or removal of beavers could limit ecosystem processes and resilience.

Beaver (Castor canadensis) mitigate the effects of climate on the area of open water in boreal wetlands in western Canada, 2008

This study examined how temperature, precipitation and beaver (Castor canadensis) activity influenced the area of open water in wetlands over a 54-year period in the mixed-wood boreal region of east-central Alberta, Canada.

Human-made Beaver Dams Likely Save Natural Wetland from Extinction

The U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management blog reports that in arid, high country Oregon, a series of manmade beaver dams (Beaver Dam Analogs) have created a watery oasis.

Could beaver compete with a declining snowpack?

To estimate the extent to which beaver dam building activity could provide transient water storage with a decreased snowpack.

Potential mitigation of and adaptation to climate-driven changes in California’s highlands through increased beaver populations

This study reviews three literatures in an effort to evaluate the potential for beaver to adapt to and to mitigate anticipated changes in California’s higher elevation land- and waterscapes.

Riparian Resilience in the Face of Interacting Disturbances

Impact of beavers regarding drought and wildfire in the Methow River Watershed

Beaver Dams and Overbank Floods Influence Groundwater–Surface Water Interactions of a Rocky Mountain Riparian Area

This study provides empirical evidence that beaver can influence hydrologic processes during the peak flow and low?flow periods on some streams, suggesting that beaver can create and maintain hydrologic regimes suitable for the formation and persistence of wetlands.