Topic Results: Stream Restoration

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Simple hand-built structures can help streams survive wildfires and drought

Low-tech stream restoration gains using beaver dam mimicry gains popularity as an effective fix for ailing waterways in the American West.

Low-Tech Process Based Restoration of Riverscapes Design Manual

The purpose of this design manual is to provide restoration practitioners with guidelines for implementing a subset of low-tech tools—namely beaver dam analogues (BDAs) and post-assisted log structures (PALS)—for initiating process-based restoration in structurally-starved riverscapes. ‘Low-tech process-based restoration’ is a practice of using simple, low unit-cost, structural additions (e.g. wood and beaver dams) to riverscapes to mimic functions and initiate specific processes. Utah State Univ., 2019.

BDA Pocket Guide – Utah Sate University

The Low-Tech Process Based Restoration of Riverscapes Pocket Guide is an illustrated and condensed version of the Design Manual. The pocket guide is designed to fit in your pocket (4 x 6”) to use as a reference in the field. 2019.

The Beaver Restoration Guidebook, Version 2.01, 2018

This guidebook provides a practical synthesis of the best available science for using beaver to improve ecosystem functions. The overall goal is to provide an accessible, useful resource for those involved in using beaver to restore streams, floodplains, wetlands, and riparian ecosystems.

Identifying Where to Place Beavers and When to Use Beaver Mimicry for Low Tech Restoration in the Arid West

This second webinar in the ASWM-BLM Beaver Restoration Webinar Series focuses on making decisions about where beaver restoration and/or the use of beaver dam analogs (BDA) can have the greatest positive and least negative impacts. It includes a demonstration of Utah State University’s Beaver Restoration Assessment Tool (BRAT), a model that helps planners assess key parameters essential to beaver work.

Using Beaver Dams to Restore Incised Stream Ecosystems

This study proposes that live vegetation and beaver dams or beaver dam analogues can substantially accelerate the recovery of incised streams and can help create and maintain complex fluvial ecosystems.

The History of Beaver and the Ecosystem Services They Provide

This first webinar in the Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) co-hosted six-part webinar series on beaver restoration details how beaver affect the land and the hydrologic impacts from loss of beaver through various hunting, trapping and removal activities. The webinar shared the role that beavers and beaver dam analogs (BDAs) can play in stream restoration.

Can the Mighty Beaver Save the Bay?

A 44 minute Baltimore Sun podcast by Dan Rodricks on beavers and their impact. He interviews beaver experts Frances Backhouse, Mike Callahan, and Scott McGill on the history, present management and future of beavers in North America. Recorded in Feb. 2, 2018

The Economic Value of Beaver Ecosystem Services Escalante River Basin, Utah 2001

In-depth report on how beaver could provide benefits to local residents and visitors well into the millions of dollars per year in Utah.

Beaver Activity Increases Aquatic Subsidies to Terrestrial Consumers

Study on how beavers alter freshwater ecosystems and increase aquatic production to determine how these changes influence the magnitude and lateral dispersal of aquatic nutrients into terrestrial ecosystems

Survey of Beaver-Related Restoration Practices in Rangeland Streams of the Western USA

Survey that identifies a need to assess beaver-related restoration projects in western rangelands to increase
awareness, accountability, and to identify gaps in scientific knowledge.

Beaver power provides year-long water to Idaho ranch

Idaho rancher, Jay Wilde, partnered with Anabranch Solutions to build BDAs, and the USFS and Idaho Fish & Game to relocate beavers into Birch Creek to help restore year-round stream flow.

Case Studies of Long-term Changes from Beaver Restoration Activities

This third webinar in the ASWM-BLM Beaver Restoration Webinar Series focused on the long-term changes in riverscapes that result from beaver restoration.  Where intense stream restoration is needed, people are identifying low-tech process-based methods that combine the management of grazing, beaver and other approaches that engage processes to create self-sustaining solutions.

Preston rancher restoring beaver to creek

Idaho rancher, Jay Wilde, and Joe Wheaton from Utah State University use BRAT, beaver restoration assessment tool, and identified good beaver habitat to help restore Birch Creek to year-round stream flow.

Working with Beaver in Pataha Creek to Restore Salmon and Steelhead Habitat: Assessment, Design, and Construction Report

The goal of this project is to test whether a restoration method developed and tested in Bridge Creek, Oregon will be suitable for restoring streams like Pataha Creek in southeast Washington.

Addressing Common Barriers and Objections to Beaver Restoration Work Webinar, 2020

This fourth webinar in the ASWM-BLM Beaver Restoration Webinar Series focused on common barriers to beaver restoration and beaver dam analog (BDA) work and when/how these barriers can be overcome.

A Critical Review of the Effects of Beavers Upon Fish and Fish Stocks

A review by the University of Southampton of how the reintroduction of beaver will affect fish in Scotalnd

Ecology, management, and conservation implications of North American beaver (Castor canadensis) in dryland streams 2014

A review that suggests that beaver activity can create substantial benefits and costs for conservation

Why Biden should launch an Ecosystem Restoration Corps in 2021

Opinion piece explaining why President Biden should create an Ecosystem Restoration Corps in 2021 to create jobs and improve this country’s environment.