Author Results: G. Hood

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Incorporating beaver dams in a physically-based hydrological model

A current challenge in ecohydrology is the incorporation of beaver dams into hydrological models. Select works have attempted to solve this problem using routing approaches, Manning coefficient variations, pond dynamics, or fully-distributed hydraulic models; however, all these approaches assume that all beaver dams are homogeneous structures and react in the same way to rainfall events. Recent findings highlight the importance of including the functional heterogeneity of beaver dams, especially the water path past the dam (dam flow state). To overcome the challenge of accounting for different dam flow states interrupting downstream water transmission in different ways, we developed BEAVERPY, a flow state-based Python package that can be coupled with the platform Cold Regions Hydrological Model (CRHM) to represent both streamflow modulation by ponds and dams, while also simulating infiltration and evapotranspiration. We used the broad-crested weir equation for the overflow dams, the Darcy equation for the seep flow dams, and the v-notch weir equation for the gapflow dams, verifying each case with synthetic experiments. To calibrate and validate the model, we instrumented the ponds and streams in a peatland fen in the Canadian Rocky Mountains in Alberta with level sensors and ‘DamCams’ (trail cameras) to capture flow type. Then, we used LIDAR DEM data and high-resolution imagery to delineate the hydrological response units. Each pond is represented as an HRU, which can interact with soil and routing modules. Finally, we conducted a scenario-testing experiment to understand the sensitivity of different beaver dam flow states for several storms. The results indicate the importance of including flow state dynamics for the beaver dam representations, and highlight the importance of integrating animal-ecological aspects into the streamflow modelling. This research has implications for understanding the use of  beaver as a nature-based solution for flood mitigation and river restoration.

Effect of Agriculture and Presence of American Beaver Castor canadensis on Winter Biodiversity of Mammals

This study compared various measures of biodiversity levels of mammals in the winter months between wetlands on agricultural land and wetlands, as well as wetlands with active and inactive beaver colonies.

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The Beaver Manifesto

Dr. Glynnis Hood has spent many years scientifically studying beavers and their ability to protect the landscape from climate change and drought. A very interesting and educational read. 2011

Ecological engineering and aquatic connectivity: a new perspective from beaver-modified wetlands, 2014

This study demonstrated that beavers actively increase the volume-to-surface area ratio of wetlands by almost 50% and that their digging of foraging channels increases average wetland perimeters by over 575%. They concluded that exclusion or removal of beavers could limit ecosystem processes and resilience.

Beaver (Castor canadensis) mitigate the effects of climate on the area of open water in boreal wetlands in western Canada, 2008

This study examined how temperature, precipitation and beaver (Castor canadensis) activity influenced the area of open water in wetlands over a 54-year period in the mixed-wood boreal region of east-central Alberta, Canada.

Fire and beaver in the boreal forest-grassland transition of western Canada – A case study from Elk Island National Park, Canada

This study found that prescribed fires negatively affected beaver lodge occupancy, an effect compounded with frequent burns. Though prescribed fire is considered an important landscape restoration process, the frequency of prescribed burning should be mitigated to ensure that flooding by beavers can continue as a key process that maintains wetlands on the landscape.

Beaver-Created Habitat Heterogeneity Influences Aquatic Invertebrate Assemblages in Boreal Canada

Demonstration on how beavers physically altered isolated shallow-water wetlands which then influenced aquatic invertebrates

Mitigating Human-Beaver Conflicts through Adaptive Management

This research project assessed the efficacy of pond levelling devices to mitigate flooding by beavers in Beaver County, Alberta.